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Scholar Commons: Using the Institutional Repository

Overview

Archiving your research can make your work freely accessible, stops your research from being taken down, and gets you a wider audience to increase your research impact. But, it can be a bit tricky to know your rights and choose the right version of your work to share. Here we outline the various versions of your article, how to find them, and when you can share them. It's helpful and will save you time and frustration in the future to save all versions of your work as they are produced. 

Most sharing policies are available through a copyright & self-archiving tool called SHERPA/RoMEO, but your publication agreement is a binding contract that tells you how and where you can legally share your work.

Pre-print

Also known as: Author's manuscript, original manuscript, first draft. Example

Definition: Draft of the manuscript before formal peer-review, or the first version sent to the journal for consideration.

Looks like: An essay with no journal branding. It is commonly a .DOCX or other text format.

How to find it:  

  • Search your email, computer hard drive and cloud storage
  • Contact your co-authors
  • Log into the journal's submission page and retrieve a copy of the submitted version
  • Contact the journal by email and ask for a copy of  the submitted version of your article

Can you share it? Yes, if you've published in a RoMEO green or yellow journal. You can usually find your journal's RoMEO color at http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/search.php

 

Post-print

Also known as: AAM, accepted manuscript author accepted manuscript, accepted author manuscript. Example

Definition: Final version of the manuscript after formal peer-review but before being type-set by the publisher. It contains all revisions made during the peer-review process.

Looks like: An essay with no journal branding, usually double-spaced, might have corrections on the sides. It is commonly a .DOCX or other text format.

How to find it:  

  • Search your email, computer hard drive, and cloud storage
  • Contact your co-authors
  • Log into the journal's submission page and retrieve a copy of the accepted version or AAM
  • Contact the journal by email and ask for a copy of the accepted version of your article

Can you share it? Yes, if you've published in a RoMEO blue or yellow journal. Blue and Yellow journals allow the author to deposit the accepted  manuscript (post-print) in a repository. You can usually find your journal's RoMEO color at http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/search.php

Publisher's PDF

Also known as: Published version, version of record. Example

Definition: Version of the manuscript published in a journal with the journal's type-set and branding.

Looks like: Has the journal branding and logo. It is commonly a PDF downloaded from the journal's website.

How to find it: Log into the journal's submission page and retrieve a copy of the published version of your article

Can you share it? Subscription journals typically don't allow authors to legally share the published version of their article online unless it was published open access, but there are exceptions. You can usually find information on your journal's self-archiving policy at http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/search.php.